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Corporate pressures Indicate new dynamics on voting rights: The Note

Companies in states considering changes can anticipate a push to take firmer stands.

It might seem like all of it came a week . But it might be the shifting corporate dynamics around voting rights are happening at the moment they'll matter most.

Delta Air Lines and the Coca-Cola Co., two Atlanta-based behemoths who issued obscure statements supporting voting rights but did not publicly oppose Georgia's new voting legislation before it passed, came out Wednesday with top executives blasting the legislation signed by the state's Republican Senate late last week.

"This law is unacceptable. It's a step backward," Coca-Cola's CEO said.

His counterpart at Delta similarly referred to as the law"not okay," telling ABC's"GMA3":"Our Black communities' voices need to be heard on this subject."

It's too late for Georgia companies to help rewrite their nation's voting legislation this year.

Other nations with tremendous, household-name businesses -- Texas, Florida, Arizona -- are still debating GOP proposals limiting voters' accessibility in their current legislative sessions. Companies based in those countries and everywhere can expect to listen to strain to take firmer stands going forward.

It was an effort he and Democratic state lawmakers worked for many years but until now had fallen short.

The legislation now makes it lawful for New Yorkers to possess up to 3 oz of marijuana and plans to address the fact that Black and Latino New Yorkers are charged and convicted of crimes related to marijuana possession by expunging the criminal records of these previously convicted. Citing similar data, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam is accelerating the process of legalization of marijuana in their own state.

In New York, legalization stands to rake in millions of dollars in tax earnings , create tasks and direct cash toward underserved communities.

Under ordinary conditions, a very proud Cuomo could have observed that this coverage triumph in a very public manner. Instead, he issued a statement marking the historical moment as crisis surrounds him on numerous fronts.

Probes to his government's reporting of COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes continue, allegations of sexual misconduct from former and current female staffers, and reports his household got particular access to COVID-19 tests in the early days of the pandemic have left the generally boisterous governor silent.

At Iowa's 2nd Congressional District, the last 2020 contest eventually came to an end on Wednesday when Democrat Rita Hart dropped her challenge to the election results. Hart withdrew her petition in the House seeking to overturn the result amid increasing pressure from both Republicans rail against a Democratic attempt to"slip" a chair from among their own and some Democrats indicating they were not on board by reversing a election outcome.

"The race is finished," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said alongside Republican Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks at Iowa, hours until Hart withdrew her ordeal.

But other races are only just beginning. On Thursday, Sen. Rick Scott, R-Fla., seat of the Senate GOP's effort arm, is in the Hawkeye State for an event with Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst along with the state party, where looming questions remain over whether longtime Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley will run for re-election in 2022. Scott advised that the Des Moines Register he'd"be surprised if he doesn't."

Meanwhile, both Iowa Democrats and Republicans are getting ready for a tough struggle to hold onto their first-in-the-nation standing in 2024, together with Iowa Republican Party Chair Jeff Kaufmann knocking Nevada's strongest Democrat amid efforts by state and national Democrats to bulge Iowa from its prime spot in favor of diverse states like Nevada and South Carolina.

"Attacking the Iowa Caucuses and other First-in-the-Nation states is not anything new for folks like Harry (Reid) and coastal elites who believe they know better than everybody else. I continue to stand shoulder to shoulder with my First In The Nation states moves and will do everything in my power to safeguard the Iowa Caucuses," he explained in a statement.

Rep. Matt Gaetz sits at the middle of a Justice Department investigation into possible violations of gender trafficking legislation that involves an alleged sexual relationship with a 17-year-old woman, multiple sources confirmed to ABC News. Reports of the research into Gaetz have attracted fresh attention and evaluation into the controversial young congressman. The national investigation is also scrutinizing the Republican's behavior not just in Florida but in other nations also, three sources knowledgeable about the investigation told ABC News.

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