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Tv review: Gardellserien The days are as the flowers bloom is a cry for help

Constantly this 1970s. Inomhusrökning. Two tv channels. The oversized glasses. Brown and not so fresh. Swedish filmmakers will continue to return to this increasingly strange decade, both pining away and be horrified. Not least when it comes to filmatiseringar of praised novels: ”the Pigsties”, ”Mig äger ingen” and ”the Ravens”. It is stylish and scenograferade stories about people in the margins, which revises the image of a secure welfare state that keeps the citizens in hand from the cradle to the grave.

Tv-help Jonas Gardell/Simon Kaijser, screenwriter, respectively, the director, who last made ”never Wipe tears without gloves" together, shows something different in its new SVT-cooperation ”on The days that the flowers are blooming."

Their miniseries takes its beginning in a shiny kedjehusområde, among the well-established middle class. To think that our children should grow up here, exclaims a just moved mom to another of the other mothers on the street. Anyone who has seen the Gardells and Kaijsers earlier 1970-century account, ”The half hidden" from the 2009, understand immediately that it is the hopeful word she will get to eat up.

, and the very feel, of course, again from ”The half hidden”. ”The days are as the flowers bloom” also moves between different timetable, from 1978 right up to our days, even if some berättelsespår slows down earlier than that. And again, it is a story about sons, more specifically four of them: my friends, Erik, Michael and Benny, plus Erik's problemförföljda big brother Torbjörn. They consider their parents ' futile attempts to lajva responsible adults.

Fathers are cowardly, deceitful or absent while the mothers struggle to keep the facade up. It is perhaps not directly about the multi-layered människoporträtt but still – it is a joy to look at, down to the smallest supporting role. Torkel Petersson is accurate räddhågsen in the role of the father who is hiding from his gränslöse son, and Magnus Krepper is perfect castad as carefree asshole who brings the mistress home at christmas.

The unfulfilled hopes, or completed tragedies, is in the Gardells world not as much about the lack of social safety nets, as if fate's whims and human fallibility. Life doesn't always turn out as planned, in spite of adequate material conditions. Memento mori, that is.

familjedynamiken, but in between it becomes well abrupt changes between the time schedule, which creates a förryckt experience. There are a number of interventions at various pain points, which sometimes becomes avbockade rather than portrayed. It also makes some things feel elaborate or predetermined – of course, such as Michael's jewish family history in Estonia, with the mass murders during the second world war, followed up with the estonia tragedy.

at the same time testify the results on the authors ' proven experience – there is a dark blot in this death's waiting room, as Gardell and Kaijser are alone in the tv-Sweden. ”The days are as the flowers bloom” is a cry for help from the 1970s that Andreas Mattsson music accompanies and answers with just the right mixture of sorrow and tenderness.

Read more: New Jonas Gardell-series opens the Swedish tv the year

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