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A roman tomb 1,500 years old unearthed in Bavaria

A team of German archaeologists, belonging to the office of research Anzerberger & Leicht, comes to discover Oberding in Upper Bavaria during the work prelimina

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A roman tomb 1,500 years old unearthed in Bavaria

A team of German archaeologists, belonging to the office of research Anzerberger & Leicht, comes to discover Oberding in Upper Bavaria during the work preliminary to the construction of a sports complex, a roman tomb dating back, according to the initial assumptions, of the Fifth century of our era.

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During the excavations, archaeologists have been intrigued by a long rectangular pit that looked like a burial ground. While digging, almost a meter deep, they very soon found the remains of a human skeleton in a relatively good state of conservation.

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From the early reviews, they have noticed the level of the right shoulder, a vestige of iron with a spiral motif, used by the soldiers of Rome to wear their cape. In addition to this fibula, the researchers have also found in the pelvis of the man, three other objects, always of iron, that in all likelihood, come from a belt.

A short sword of the roman

the most significant element is the discovery of a sword which is relatively short, 70 cm, found to the right of the skeleton. Birgit Anzenberger, director of the bureau of studies, archaeology has drawn at once a conclusion which could guide historical research in the future : "The weapon is dated to the second quarter of the Fifth century, that is to say almost thirty years before the fall of the roman empire in 476 after. J-C. It belonged probably to a roman warrior, at the age of twenty years. Its majestic stature and the good of the state of its dentition indicates that it was probably a patrician. It really is a significant discovery, archaeological and historical."
Finally, other artifacts found at Oberding, pottery of the roman and some other objects non-ferrous dug up in another pit, suggest according to the lead archaeologist on this site, located in present-day Bavaria, would have sheltered a roman colony.

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