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"This is the best car in the world" - the astonishing chutzpah of the BMW boss

Oliver Zipse, head of the BMW automobile group, has probably never been accused of a lack of self-confidence.

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"This is the best car in the world" - the astonishing chutzpah of the BMW boss

Oliver Zipse, head of the BMW automobile group, has probably never been accused of a lack of self-confidence. His appearance on Wednesday in Berlin also testified to this. The car manager gave a short speech at an event organized by the Bosch Group, with the company's current top model, the electric i7, standing next to him.

Of course, this is not just any sedan. "It's the best car in the world at the moment," Zipse said immodestly. That's how motor journalists and other car experts see it.

Then the manager dealt out against the eternal competitor Mercedes-Benz, although without naming its name. “We don't leave the lower market segments, that's very important. Even if you see yourself as a premium manufacturer, it's wrong to leave the lower market segments," Zipse shouted into the hall, earning thunderous applause.

Mercedes boss Ola Källenius had received a lot of criticism this year for wanting to significantly thin out the model range below the E and S classes. In an interview with WELT AM SONNTAG in the summer, he vehemently denied that they wanted to withdraw completely from the segment.

Large luxury cars are far more profitable than smaller models for car manufacturers such as Mercedes, BMW and Audi.

BMW still hopes for the small vehicles. Especially in Europe, where a recession is looming, the aim is to achieve high sales figures for the small SUV X1 in the coming year. Instead of just class like Mercedes, BMW still relies on mass under Zipse.

Overall, the 58-year-old sees his company on an excellent course through the transformation of the automotive industry. In the fight against climate change, BMW is a model company from Zipse's point of view, as a study by the investment bank Morgan Stanley has just shown.

"With our strategy, we are right on the way to the 1.5 degree target," said the manager. "If every company did it like BMW, then we would reach the 1.5 degree target."

The goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees due to the greenhouse effect is currently a topic at the UN climate summit in Egypt.

In an interview with WELT AM SONNTAG, the President of the Association of the Automotive Industry, Hildegard Müller, confirmed that German companies are committed to the global climate goals. Now the UN meetings should become implementation conferences instead of target conferences.

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