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This can be a departure to a new church

Of course, it also has something to do with the lack of staff: if you want to employ 800,000 people, you can no longer afford to throw out a kindergarten teacher with a lesbian partner or to fire a divorced clinic doctor if you remarry.

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This can be a departure to a new church

Of course, it also has something to do with the lack of staff: if you want to employ 800,000 people, you can no longer afford to throw out a kindergarten teacher with a lesbian partner or to fire a divorced clinic doctor if you remarry.

In this respect, it reveals first of all common sense that in the Catholic Church in Germany a new labor law for the approximately 700,000 employees of Caritas and the 90,000 employees in administration is to apply in the future.

At the same time, the Catholic German Bishops' Conference (DBK) with its recommendations published on Tuesday, which still have to be implemented into binding law by the individual dioceses, at least largely clears up a controversial issue that has been causing it more and more trouble in recent years.

Namely: How can it be that employees in Caritas nursing homes or Catholic schools, which are almost always financed by public social security funds or from state budgets, are subject to a specifically Catholic labor law?

Since the church has been thinking less and less about this, the core area of ​​private life between divorces, second marriages and same-sex partnerships should now be irrelevant in terms of labor law for all those employees who are not clergy or religious.

Through this extensive - not complete - understanding of evangelical developments, the church employment relationships, which can now be seen in terms of collective bargaining, are removed from public criticism.

At the same time, one can speak of a success for those Catholic reform groups that otherwise feel on the defensive in the debates about the synodal path. Because in the future, the hundreds of thousands of ordinary church workers should be exactly as open about sexual orientation and partnerships as those reformers are demanding.

This success weighs all the more heavily since, according to various surveys, the vast majority of citizens do not expect (priestly-celibate) proclamation and administration of the sacraments from the church anyway, but rather charitable service to the elderly and the sick, the poor and children. And from this service, from this huge relevance side of the church, Catholic sexual constrictions are now to largely disappear.

However, this can only count as the beginning of a renewed church if Caritas and Catholic schools are really churches. And not just cash-financed run-of-the-mill nursing homes with crosses at the entrance or educational institutions with which ambitious middle-class parents can give their children advancement advantages.

In other words: If all those institutions do not practice a particularly philanthropic Christianity, the abolition of Catholic labor law specifics is a reason to transfer them to public ownership.

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