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At the Armilla Air Base, civilians can emotional swear the flag

Three hundred fifty-one stories could be told, one for each person who wore the flag at Armilla Air Base this morning in a solemn act presided by Lieutenant General Ruben Carlos Garcia Servit, head the Torrejon Air Operations Center.

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At the Armilla Air Base, civilians can emotional swear the flag

Three hundred fifty-one stories could be told, one for each person who wore the flag at Armilla Air Base this morning in a solemn act presided by Lieutenant General Ruben Carlos Garcia Servit, head the Torrejon Air Operations Center. He wanted to accompany Colonel-in-Chief Luis Garcia-Almenta on an extremely special day.

In his address to the attendees, the colonel recounted some of these stories. I was able also to meet Francis Rodriguez and Angel Rojas (councilor of Churriana De la Vega), as well as many family members and friends. The Tablada Air Barracks Colonel Fernando Alcazar also attended.

Luis Garcia-Almenta talked about Dona Carmen, a young spirit of 93 who wanted to take her vows. Soledad, who after having received the most important sacraments-from the baptism-in the chapel of enclosure, wanted to strengthen her ties more; Yerai -I wish it is written that way- was eighteen years old and was one of five people who came from the Dominican Republic, one from Scotland, "to swear and be married."

They were not visible to me, but Maria Trinidad Carrasco, seventy-one, could be found. She is still very much the same artist and Albaicinian accent she used in her birthplace, although she now lives in Churriana. Looking up at the sky, she said that she swore to the flag in order to create an illusion, and "especially for Enrique," she added. Celia Alvarez was there with her daughter Celia Alvarez. They wore a mantilla and she spoke about her experience as a painter.

Maria Munoz had good reason to renew her promise with Dolores Maria Hernandez, mother of the baritone Pablo Galvez, and Jesus Hernandez. This is where the story begins. In 1986, Jesus swore the flag and his mother, Dolores Maria Hernandez (mother of the baritone Pablo Galvez), wanted to be with him. She was the first woman to do this in Viator camp, specifically in lieutenant colonel’s office.

Angeles Orantes-Zurita told me, if it was about emotions, that her father had recited his oath at the same spot where he had served military service sixty-six-years earlier. He hadn't returned. She still remembered many things even though he had left via helicopter. Antonio Orantes was a brilliant businessman who also heads a remarkable family saga. Angeles and Alberto were there with him; Julio and Manuela were his children and grandchildren, proudly dressing in the same outfit as their grandfather.

Agustin Laserrot was talking with Francisco Jose Ocana from Vox. I also got to say hello Patricia Botet, who was sworn into together with Carmen Lopez and her parents Agustin Botet. She was accompanied by her children, her inlaws and Tayo Betoret, her husband.

Rita Martinez, Eduardo Salas, and Mari Carmen Salas, their children Lucia, Eduardo, and Mari Carmen, swore in. Also, a large contingent from Santa Fe's Perpetuo Socorro residence joined them. It was a beautiful day, which ended with an Aspa patrol exhibition.

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