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Reader reactions on the series on Emotions in the right

Here in Sweden there is a clear fear of emotionalism, and it applies not only to the courts in Sweden, but also in politics and in the media world, " says Kari

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Reader reactions on the series on Emotions in the right

Here in Sweden there is a clear fear of emotionalism, and it applies not only to the courts in Sweden, but also in politics and in the media world, " says Karin.

English newscaster in the tv sound as cold and impersonal when they talk about tax increases and to ICE halshuggit women and children, " says Karin. She also compares the debate in the Swedish parliament with it, for example, the English parliament.

in a Swedish court, but has also advokatlicens from a country in Latin america.

– In the country's courts tend to display emotions very clearly, but I did not perceive that judges are more biased and subjective than in Sweden. There, as here, based the judgments on the laws.

Read more: ”Clients need to know what emotion as tolerated”

According to Karin characterized the work of the Swedish courts of a substantial ”distortions of sensation”, it also applies outside of the actual trials in the contacts between colleagues.

" There is a clear cultural aspect. Then there are a vocabulary for how the emotions may or may not appear during a trial.

Why treat the media is often the lay assessors that they do not exist, when they are so important in the sentencing because they have three votes out of four?

at the Solna district court and chairman of the nämndemannaföreningen. In an email to the Inside, he means that the lay assessors is often forgotten when there is talk of hearings. He points out that a Swedish district court consists of four judges – a juristdomare, usually a district court judge, and three lay magistrates, that is to say, jurors:

”All the four have completed domared and have one vote each. The lay assessors are therefore in the majority in the deliberation and voting of the parliament made after the trial and are important actors in the sentencing. They must like the rest of the players at the hearing to be neutral and objective,” writes Jan Perers.

describes how prospective lawyers are taught to not talk about their emotions, but trained in a culture where feelings are taboo for a professional prosecutor or judge.

”But the lay assessors do not have the training. How does that affect their feelings and emotions, their actions and the judiciary at a trial? The question also needs to be highlighted.

Why treat the media is often the lay assessors that they do not exist, when they are so important in the sentencing because they have three votes out of four? It is only when one considers that the lay assessors have committed something wrong that it has to be up large in the media,” writes Jan Perers.

Read more: ”Shortcomings in the police investigations makes many upset.”

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