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Here are the pictures: Show the sun closer than ever

Scientists and other space enthusiasts around the world waited in excitement at the tailors, who at the time was called at 14. the Satellite 'Solar Orbitor'

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Here are the pictures: Show the sun closer than ever

Scientists and other space enthusiasts around the world waited in excitement at the tailors, who at the time was called at 14.

the Satellite 'Solar Orbitor' - or SolO - has for five months been on a pioneering mission and publish now the closest images of the sun ever taken. And then take it also for the first time images of the sun's poles. This was stated NASA in a press release.

Within the display had Jørgen Christensen-Dalsgaard, a professor at Aarhus University, to Ekstra Bladet announced that it would be twice as sharp pictures as you have seen so far.

- It was exciting to see. And an incredibly good start, says Christensen-Dalsgaard. He has even been to develop instruments for the satellite, and has followed anxiously from the cottage in west Jutland.

- I was particularly impressed with the EUI-images (extreme ultraviolet images, red.), as shown, they called for 'campfire'. It was incredibly beautiful pictures. And it is with to do a a little bit wiser on how the sun works and interacts with other planets.

Article continues below pictures ...

the UNION-the pictures were a revelation. Photo: ESA/ATG medialab

SolO has been under way for barely a half years, since it was sent into space back in February. Many aspects of its ascent has been a watershed. Among other things, the way they have managed to control the satellite in a new orbit on.

- When you put a satellite in orbit, the planetary orbit, which moves as the discs on a turntable. Therefore we have had to change on the banehældningen by sending it past the Venus several times, so it got a little extra boost by Venus' gravity.

- It gets satellitens trajectory to deflect, such as SolO can observe the sun's poles and get closer to the sun.

The new pictures are taken the 77 million kilometres from earth, which is a good halfway point between earth and the sun, explains ESA scientist Daniel Müller. It will take the satellite two years in all to reach as close to the 5500 degrees warm sun, as it is with current technology can do.

This is the satellite only the halfway point in the scientific phase, which culminates approximately two years from now.

- It will certainly be worth to follow.

Live coverage of the publication could be followed here.

Photo: ESA/ATG medialab

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