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For science's sake: the Woman was frozen down and cut in of 27,000 pieces

The american woman, Sue Potter, who died of pneumonia in 2015, when she was 87 years old, is the first man in the world, who voluntarily donated his body to sci

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For science's sake: the Woman was frozen down and cut in of 27,000 pieces

The american woman, Sue Potter, who died of pneumonia in 2015, when she was 87 years old, is the first man in the world, who voluntarily donated his body to science in order to become a 'digital cadaver'.

After his death, was Sue Potter, frozen and then cut in the 27.000 pieces, painstakingly preserved for three years and then digitized with the purpose of teaching university students about the human body.

It is going to appear in an article in the famous magazine National Geographic's January edition in the year 2019, which has the title 'The Future of Medicine'.

It writes National Geographic. Ekstra Bladet has been in contact with National Geographic and has been given permission to use some of their images in connection with the unusual case.

Here is dr. Vic Spitzer with the frozen corpses of Sue Potter. (Photo: National Geographic/Lynn Johnson)

Sue Potter donated already his body to science 15 years before his death.

And over the last 15 years of her life registered Sue Potter all the details about her life, from her lifestyle, emotions, joys and pains, to quite ordinary everyday things, so that future prospective students will also understand what man really is behind the medical information digitally can be read around her body.

Before his death, wanted Sue Potter also to see the saw, which should save her up in the 27.000 pieces. And she was also allowed to see the freezer, where her body had to be stored for a longer period of time. As a little bizarre detail, it may also be disclosed to Sue Potter demanded to be cut up to the sound of classical music. She demanded also that her equal in the context should be surrounded by a sea of roses.

Sue Potter grew up in nazi Germany, where she as a young woman was left with her grandparents, because her parents emigrated to New York. She forgave never his parents for this action.

After The Second world War emigrated she even to New York, where she met her husband Harry in 1956. The couple had two daughters together. It is not completely clear, what happened with Sue's husband, Harry, later in life. And at the age of 73 years was Sue suddenly alone in the world, because she, for an unknown reason no longer saw his daughters.

In the course of the coming year led Sue of various serious diseases including diabetes and cancer. And in the year 2000, when she even thought that she only had approx. a years back of her life, she read an article about the pioneering scientific project 'The human simulation project'.

the Team behind the project had already in 1993 and 1994 frozen two human bodies and subsequently cut them into small pieces in order to digitize menneskedelene. There was talk of a 39-year-old man, who was executed on a dødsgang in a prison in the UNITED states, as well as a 59-year-old woman who died of a heart disease in the state of Maryland in 1994.

Sue Potter volunteered, however, as the first human being, who voluntarily surrendered his body to the scientific experiment, which in a way would make her body immortal in a digital universe.

It took in addition, 60 days to save Sue Potter's body out of 27,000 pieces. And then it took approx. 2-3 years painstakingly to outline the thousands of menneskedele into the digital universe.

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